Home > Play > 2013 > 10 > 29
games
0
Parenting Education Special Needs Video   Online Games Way More Than A Box Activities


Pediatricians Set New Limits on Screen Time - Warning Move Slowly
TOPICS | Parenting Posted Tuesday, October 29, 2013 (1,958 views)


Yesterday iPad for Christmas was trending on Twitter.  I personally was appalled. As a parent of young children, and a lover off all technology,  I urge you to move slowly with your children into the screen world, and especially the tablet world. Once you make the jump with your children there is no turning back.  We as a society are learning more and more the consequences of extended time in front of screens, with the worst offenders being some of the most popular tablets. Interestingly, yesterday, the American Academy of Pediatrics' set new guidelines for screen time outlined brilliantly in this article by the Wall Street Journal. So move slowly my friends into the world of tablets .

REPUBLISHED FROM THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Parents should ban electronic media during mealtimes and after bedtime as part of a comprehensive "family media use plan," according to new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The influential new guidelines are being spurred by a growing recognition of kids' nearly round-the-clock media consumption, which includes everything from television to texting and social media.

"Excessive media use is associated with obesity, poor school performance, aggression and lack of sleep," said Marjorie Hogan, co-author of the new policy and a pediatrician.

Families should have a no-device rule during meals and after bedtime, the guidelines say. Parents should also set family rules covering the use of the Internet and social media and cellphones and texting, including, perhaps, which sites can be visited, who can be called and giving parental access to Facebook accounts. The policy also reiterated the AAP's existing recommendations: Kids should limit the amount of screen time for entertainment to less than two hours per day; children younger than 2 shouldn't have any TV or Internet exposure. Also, televisions and Internet-accessible devices should be kept out of kids' bedrooms.

Doctors say parents need to abide by the family rules, too, to model healthy behavior. That, some say, may be the toughest part. "If you go to any restaurant, Family 3.0 is Mom and Dad are on their devices and the kids are on theirs," says Donald L. Shifrin, a pediatrician in Bellevue, Wash., and an AAP spokesman. "Who is talking to each other?"

Children ages 8 to 18 spent an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes a day consuming media for fun, including TV, music, videogames and other content in 2009, according to a 2010 report from the Kaiser Family Foundation. The report was based on a survey of 2,002 third- through 12th-graders, 702 of whom completed a seven-day media use diary. That was up about an hour and 17 minutes a day from five years earlier. About two-thirds of 8- to 18-year-olds said they had no rules on the amount of time they spent watching TV, playing videogames or using the computer, the Kaiser report found.

Use of mobile devices by young kids has soared. A new report from Common Sense Media, a child-advocacy group based in San Francisco, found that 17% of children 8 and younger use mobile devices daily, up from 8% in 2011.




Contributed by
Matt Hansen
Fat Brain Toys


Matt Hansen is the Director of Marketing at Fat Brain Toys. He is the father of two children, Duncan (4) and Hadley (6), and has been married to his wife Kate for 10 years. He is a former minor league baseball executive spending 10 years working for teams such as the St. Paul Saints and Sioux Falls Canaries. Matt became the director of marketing for Fat Brain Toys in 2012. He is responsible for increasing the brand presence both online and offline.

Website

Visit Matt On...

Read more from
Matt Hansen...


The PLAY blog is a platform dedicated to honest, engaged, informed, intelligent and open conversation about parenting. However, the opinions expressed on this site are those of individual parents/writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of Fat Brain Toys. In addition, content provided on this site is for entertainment or informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or safety advice.

McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams
Home | Shopping Cart | Help | Privacy Policy | Return Authorizations | Toy Blog | Coming Soon | Christmas Toys
Best Toys by Age | Birthday Gifts | Top Kids Toys | Toys on Sale | New Toys | Popular Toy Searches

Copyright © 2003-2014 Fat Brain Toys LLC. All rights reserved. Fat Brain Toys® is a registered service mark of Fat Brain Toys, LLC
Fat Brain Toys Offices
1405 N 205th Street, Suite 120
Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022
Phone 1-800-590-5987
Omaha Toy Store
16909 Burke Street, Suite 131
Omaha, Nebraska 68118
Phone 402-504-6218
Overland Park/Kansas City Toy Store
5601 West 135th Street, Suite 2230
Overland Park, Kansas 66223
Phone 913-305-4894

  MacWeb01