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British Teachers Find Infants Unable to Use Toy Building Blocks Due to iPad Addiction

TOPICS | Parenting | Education Posted Friday, April 18, 2014 (452 views)

This article from the The Telegraph, a respected newspaper in the UK,  paints a doom and gloom scenerio on a future generation of toddlers unable to play with toys as simple as building blocks due to their obsession with tablets and cellphones. Although we have not seen this extreme, we all know that overuse of tablet and smatrt phones for children is not great for their development. 

 

REPUBLISHED FROM THE TELEGRAPH

Rising numbers of infants lack the motor skills needed to play with building blocks because of an “addiction” to tablet computers and smartphones, according to teachers. Many children aged just three or four can “swipe a screen” but have little or no dexterity in their fingers after spending hours glued to iPads, it was claimed.

Members of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers also warned how some older children were unable to complete traditional pen and paper exams because their memory had been eroded by overexposure to screen-based technology.

They called on parents to crackdown on tablet computer use and even turn off wi-fi at night to address the problem. The comments were made after Ofcom figures showed the proportion of households with tablet computers more than doubled from 20 to 51 per cent last year. Experts have warned that the growth is having a serious effect on children’s social and physical development.

Last year, a doctor claimed that rising numbers of young people – including one aged just four – required therapy for compulsive behaviour after being exposed to the internet and digital devices from birth.

Addressing the ATL annual conference in Manchester, Colin Kinney, a teacher from Northern Ireland, said colleagues “talk of pupils who come into their classrooms after spending most of the previous night playing computer games and whose attention span is so limited that they may as well not be there”.

He added: “I have spoken to a number of nursery teachers who have concerns over the increasing numbers of young pupils who can swipe a screen but have little or no manipulative skills to play with building blocks or the like, or the pupils who cannot socialise with other pupils but whose parents talk proudly of their ability to use a tablet or smartphone.”

Addressing members, he said the “brilliant computer skills” shown by many pupils was “outweighed by their deteriorating skills in pen and paper exams because they rely on instant support of the computer and are often unable to apply what they should have learned from their textbooks”.

The ATL backed plans to draw up new guidance to be issued to teachers and parents showing the “best way forward” when dealing with children who are “addicted” to iPads and iPhones.

Mark Montgomery, a teacher from Northern Ireland, said overexposure to technology had been linked to weight gain, aggressive behaviour, tiredness and repetitive strain injury. He called on parents to turn home wi-fi off overnight to stop children staying awake to play online games on iPads.

“It is our job to make sure that the technology is being used wisely and productively and that pupils are not making backward steps and getting obsessed and exhibiting aggressive and anti-social behaviours,” he added.

“In the same way we can use a brick to either break a window or build a house, digital technology can be used for good or bad, and teachers can and should help their pupils make positive choices so they have positive experiences.”




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Content courtesy of Graeme Paton

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