Home > Play > 2014 > 3 > 31
games
0
Parenting Education Special Needs Video   Online Games Way More Than A Box Activities


Up to 40 Percent of US Children May Lack Secure Attachment to Parents

TOPICS | Parenting Posted Monday, March 31, 2014 (1,280 views)

An interesting new study discussed below by Dr. Rick Nauert shows a disturbing trend associated with children and attachment. We all know the power of good play and attachment. Below is an insight into the consequences of children not gaining those valuable attachments.

REPUBLISHED FROM PSYCHCENTRAL.COM
A somber new study of some 14,000 U.S. children finds that 40 percent lack strong emotional bonds with parents and are more likely to face educational and behavioral problems as a result.

In a report published by Sutton Trust, a London-based institute that has published more than 140 research papers on education and social mobility, researchers found that infants under the age of three who do not form strong bonds with their mothers or fathers are more likely to be aggressive, defiant, and hyperactive as adults.

These bonds, or secure attachments, are formed through early parental care, such as picking up a child when he or she cries or holding and reassuring a child.

“When parents tune in to and respond to their children’s needs and are a dependable source of comfort, those children learn how to manage their own feeling and behaviors,” said researcher and doctoral student Sophie Moullin. “These secure attachments to their mothers and fathers provide these children with a base from which they can thrive.”

In the new reports, researchers used data collected by the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, a nationally representative U.S. study of 14,000 children born in 2001. The researchers also reviewed more than 100 academic studies.

Their analysis shows that about 60 percent of children develop strong attachments to their parents, which are formed through simple actions, such as holding a baby lovingly and responding to the baby’s needs.

Such actions support children’s social and emotional development, which, in turn, strengthens their cognitive development, the researchers write.

These children are more likely to be resilient to poverty, family instability, parental stress, and depression. Additionally, if boys growing up in poverty have strong parental attachments, they are 2-1/2 times less likely to display behavior problems at school.

The approximately 40 percent who lack secure attachments, on the other hand, are more likely to have poorer language and behavior before entering school.

This effect continues throughout the children’s lives, and such children are more likely to leave school without further education, employment, or training, the researchers write.

Among children growing up in poverty, poor parental care and insecure attachment before age four strongly predicted a failure to complete school.

Of the 40 percent who lack secure attachments, 25 percent avoid their parents when they are upset (because their parents are ignoring their needs), and 15 percent resist their parents because their parents cause them distress.

Dr. Susan Campbell, a professor of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh who studies social and emotional development in young children and infants, said insecure attachments emerge when primary caregivers are not “tuned in” to their infant’s social signals, especially their cries of distress during infancy.

“When helpless infants learn early that their cries will be responded to, they also learn that their needs will be met, and they are likely to form a secure attachment to their parents,” Campbell said.

“However, when caregivers are overwhelmed because of their own difficulties, infants are more likely to learn that the world is not a safe place — leading them to become needy, frustrated, withdrawn, or disorganized.”

The researchers argue that many parents — including middle-class parents — need more support to provide proper parenting, including family leave, home visits, and income supports.

“Targeted interventions can also be highly effective in helping parents develop the behaviors that foster secure attachment. Supporting families who are at risk for poor parenting ideally starts early — at birth or even before,” said Jane Waldfogel, Ph.D., a co-author of the report and a professor of social work and public affairs at Columbia.




Contributed by
Fat Brain Toys

Fat Brain Toys is a leading retailer and developer of specialty toys & games.

Website

Visit Fat Brain Toys On...

The PLAY blog is a platform dedicated to honest, engaged, informed, intelligent and open conversation about parenting. However, the opinions expressed on this site are those of individual parents/writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of Fat Brain Toys. In addition, content provided on this site is for entertainment or informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or safety advice.

McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams
Home | Shopping Cart | Help | Privacy Policy | Return Authorizations | Toy Blog | Coming Soon | Christmas Toys
Best Toys by Age | Birthday Gifts | Top Kids Toys | Toys on Sale | New Toys | Popular Toy Searches

Copyright © 2003-2015 Fat Brain Toys LLC. All rights reserved. Fat Brain Toys® is a registered service mark of Fat Brain Toys, LLC
Fat Brain Toys Offices
1405 N 205th Street, Suite 120
Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022
Phone 1-800-590-5987
Omaha Toy Store
16909 Burke Street, Suite 131
Omaha, Nebraska 68118
Phone 402-504-6218
Overland Park/Kansas City Toy Store
5601 West 135th Street, Suite 2230
Overland Park, Kansas 66223
Phone 913-305-4894

  MacWeb03